Max Duggan

American football player (born 2001)

American football player
Max Duggan
No. 8 – Los Angeles Chargers
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born: (2001-03-12) March 12, 2001 (age 23)
Council Bluffs, Iowa, U.S.
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:207 lb (94 kg)
Career information
High school:Lewis Central (Council Bluffs)
College:TCU (2019–2022)
NFL draft:2023 / Round: 7 / Pick: 239
Career history
  • Los Angeles Chargers (2023–present)
Roster status:Active
Career highlights and awards
Player stats at PFR

Maxwell Duggan (born March 12, 2001) is an American football quarterback for the Los Angeles Chargers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the TCU Horned Frogs, winning several national awards after being part of the team that made it to the 2023 College Football Playoff National Championship game. He was selected by the Chargers in the seventh round of the 2023 NFL draft.

Early life

Duggan was born on March 12, 2001, in Council Bluffs, Iowa.[1][2] His two older siblings, Sam and Megan, were both adopted from South Korea.[3]

At Lewis Central High School, Duggan played football, baseball, basketball and ran track. On the football field, he was coached by his father and was four-year starter at quarterback.[2] As a senior, he passed for 2,130 yards and 24 touchdowns while adding another 1,223 yards and 25 touchdowns on the ground on his way to being named the 2018 Iowa Gatorade High School Player of the Year.[4]

Rated as a 4-star prospect, Duggan was ranked as the top recruit in Iowa for the Class of 2019.[5] Despite scholarship offers from regional programs Nebraska, Iowa and Iowa State, national powers like Georgia, Ohio State and Penn State[5] as well as his favorite team from childhood, Notre Dame,[6] Duggan chose to play his college football at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas, announcing his commitment to the Horned Frogs via Twitter.[7] He graduated from Lewis Central a semester early in order to enroll at TCU in January 2019.[8]

College career

2019

Duggan's collegiate debut came in the Frogs' 2019 season opener, a 39–7 home victory over the Arkansas-Pine Bluff Golden Lions when he came on in relief of starter Alex Delton late in the first quarter, scoring his first career rushing touchdown on his first possession. His first career touchdown pass came in the second half on a 37-yard strike to Jalen Reagor.[9] He made his first career start three weeks later in a game against the SMU Mustangs, becoming just the second true freshman to start at quarterback under longtime TCU coach Gary Patterson.[10] In late October, he scored the game-winning touchdown on an 11-yard run with less than two minutes remaining as TCU upset the 15th-ranked Texas Longhorns, 37–27.[11] He ended his first season having thrown for a school freshman record 2,077 yards and 15 touchdowns as the Horned Frogs finished with a 5–7 record.[12][13]

2020

Prior to Duggan's sophomore season in 2020, a medical screening that was part of enhanced safety protocols associated with the COVID-19 pandemic revealed that he had been born with Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, a condition that affects the electrical system of the heart.[14] Two days after undergoing a nine-hour surgery to fix the issue, he returned to the hospital with a blood clot and underwent an additional, emergency surgery.[15] Despite these medical ordeals, he was ready to play in the Frogs' 2020 season opener, throwing for 241 yards and three touchdowns against the Iowa State Cyclones.[16] A week later in a road game against the 9th-ranked Texas Longhorns, Duggan once again sealed an upset win over the Longhorns with his legs as he scored from 26 yards out late in the fourth quarter in the 33–31 TCU victory.[17] Beginning with a road win over the Baylor Bears on Halloween, Duggan led the Frogs to wins in five of their last six contests – highlighted by his 369 yards of total offense (265 passing, 104 rushing) in a 29–22 home victory over the 15th-ranked Oklahoma State Cowboys.[18] TCU finished with a 6–4 record and accepted an invitation to play the Arkansas Razorbacks in the Texas Bowl, but the game was canceled as part of the second wave of the pandemic.[19][20] Duggan ended the 10-game, shortened season with 1,795 yards and 10 touchdowns passing – and with 526 yards on the ground and 10 rushing touchdowns, became the first TCU quarterback to lead the team in rushing since Gil Bartosh in 1950.[16]

2021

Duggan's junior campaign was a frustrating time for the TCU program and him personally. He did throw for a career-best 346 yards and four touchdowns against the 4th-ranked Oklahoma Sooners,[21] but he was hampered by injuries for much of the season as he played through a broken bone and torn tendons in one of his feet.[14] In a late October road loss against the Kansas State Wildcats that dropped the Frogs' record to 3–5, Duggan was benched when his injuries severely limited his productivity. The next day, Patterson's tenure at TCU came to an abrupt halt and interim coach Jerry Kill took over for the remainder of the season.[22] While Duggan was out, backup Chandler Morris threw for 461 yards in leading TCU to a 30–28 upset victory over the 12th-ranked Baylor Bears.[23] After TCU hired Sonny Dykes as their new head coach in November, speculation that Morris' performance against Baylor could signal the end of Duggan's time as the Frogs' starting quarterback increased when Dykes told reporters that there would be open competition for the job going into 2022.[24]

2022

In August, the quarterback competition that lasted throughout the spring and summer ended when Dykes and offensive coordinator Garrett Riley informed Duggan that Morris would be the starter. Rather than entering the transfer portal to find a new program, Duggan elected to remain at TCU and told Dykes that he intended to be the best backup quarterback in the country and that he'd do anything to help Morris succeed.[14] With the Frogs leading 17–6 in the 3rd quarter of the season-opener at the Colorado Buffaloes, Morris injured his knee. Duggan came on in relief, leading the Frogs on two touchdown drives to pull away, 38–13.[25]

After throwing for a career-high 390 yards in a win over the Tarleton State Texans and going on the road to reclaim the Iron Skillet from crosstown rivals, the SMU Mustangs, to finish the non-conference schedule 3–0, Duggan and the Frogs made a statement with a resounding 55–24 victory over the 18th-ranked Oklahoma Sooners.[26][27] With 302 yards and three touchdowns passing and 116 yards and two touchdowns rushing, Duggan earned Big 12 Offensive Player of the Week honors.[28][29] In each of the next three weeks, Duggan led the Frogs to come-from-behind victories – first on the road at the 19th-ranked Kansas Jayhawks with a last-minute, game-winning 24-yard touchdown pass to Quentin Johnston[30] and then overcoming double-digit deficits at home against both the 8th-ranked Oklahoma State Cowboys[31] in double overtime and the 17th-ranked Kansas State Wildcats[32] to reach 7–0.

In November, Duggan and TCU defeated their in-state rivals, the Texas Tech Red Raiders, the 18th-ranked Texas Longhorns and the Baylor Bears in consecutive weeks to reach 11–0. In the game against Baylor, the Frogs trailed by eight late in the fourth quarter. After a touchdown to pull within two and a quick stop by the TCU defense to get the ball back with 1:30 on the clock and no timeouts, Duggan led a 54-yard drive to get into field goal range – setting up a dramatic final sequence in which the TCU field goal unit ran onto the field with the clock running before kicker Griffin Kell connected on a game-winning 40-yard field goal that left the McLane Stadium crowd stunned; the TCU fans in attendance cheered in excitement after the field goal was good.[33]

After a home win over the Iowa State Cyclones that made Duggan the first quarterback to lead TCU to a perfect 12–0 regular season since Andy Dalton in 2010, the Frogs were set for a rematch with Kansas State in the 2022 Big 12 Championship Game. Down by 11 in the 4th quarter, Duggan led TCU on yet another comeback, scoring on an 8-yard touchdown run with 1:51 remaining to put him over 100 rushing yards for the game and connected with tight end Jared Wiley on the 2-point conversion to force overtime. The Wildcats prevailed in OT[34] – but the next day, 12–1 TCU became the first team from the state of Texas to be selected to play in the College Football Playoff.[35]

Duggan's accolades for the season include becoming the first Horned Frog to be named Big 12 Offensive Player of the Year[36] since Trevone Boykin in 2014 and the first TCU player to win the Davey O'Brien Award[37] (named after former TCU quarterback Davey O'Brien) and the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award.[38] On December 6, he became the first TCU player since LaDainian Tomlinson in 2000 to be named a finalist for the Heisman Trophy.[39] He would finish second in the Heisman voting, behind Caleb Williams from the USC Trojans.

On December 18, 2022, Duggan announced he would forego his remaining college eligibility and declare for the 2023 NFL draft, though he stated that he would still start for the Horned Frogs in the College Football Playoff.[40]

In the College Football Playoff, they beat the heavy favorites Michigan Wolverines 51–45 in the Fiesta Bowl.[41] He went 14 of 29, threw for 225 yards, and 2 touchdowns and two interceptions.[42] TCU lost to the Georgia Bulldogs in the 2023 College Football Playoff National Championship 65–7. Duggan passed for 152 yards, throwing no touchdowns, 2 interceptions and rushing for the only TCU touchdown.[43]

After the end of the 2022–23 school year, Duggan was named the men's recipient of two Big 12 all-sports awards. First, on July 12, 2023, he and Iowa State women's basketball star Ashley Joens were announced as the inaugural recipients of the Bob Bowlsby Award, honoring on- and off-field leadership and excellence and described by the Big 12 as "the Conference's most prestigious individual accolade".[44] Then, on July 31, Duggan and Texas women's track star Julien Alfred were named as Big 12 Athletes of the Year across all sports.[45]

College statistics

Season Games Passing Rushing
GP GS Record Cmp Att Pct Yds Avg TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD
TCU Horned Frogs
2019 12 10 3–7 181 339 53.4 2,077 6.1 15 10 113.6 130 555 4.3 6
2020 10 9 6–3 146 240 60.8 1,795 7.5 10 4 134.1 116 526 4.5 10
2021 10 10 4–6 145 227 63.9 2,048 9.0 16 6 157.6 105 352 3.4 3
2022 15 14 12–2 267 419 63.7 3,698 8.8 32 8 159.2 137 423 3.1 9
Career 47 43 25–18 739 1,225 60.3 9,618 7.9 73 28 141.4 488 1,856 3.8 28

Professional career

Pre-draft measurables
Height Weight Arm length Hand span 40-yard dash 10-yard split 20-yard split 20-yard shuttle Three-cone drill Vertical jump Broad jump
6 ft 1+12 in
(1.87 m)
207 lb
(94 kg)
30+38 in
(0.77 m)
9+78 in
(0.25 m)
4.52 s 1.55 s 2.64 s 4.45 s 7.26 s 30.5 in
(0.77 m)
9 ft 8 in
(2.95 m)
All values from NFL Combine[46][47]

Duggan was selected by the Los Angeles Chargers in the seventh round with the 239th overall pick in the 2023 NFL draft.[48] He was waived on August 29, 2023, and re-signed to the practice squad.[49][50] On December 12, Duggan was signed to the active roster following a season-ending injury to starter Justin Herbert.[51] He was waived on December 18, and re-signed to the practice squad.[52] On December 22, Duggan was signed to the active roster.[53] On December 25, Duggan was waived and re-signed to the practice squad two days later.[54][55] He signed a reserve/future contract on January 11, 2024.[56]

References

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  2. ^ a b Bland, Evan (December 9, 2022). "Bloody noses and broken fingers: TCU quarterback Max Duggan began path to glory in Council Bluffs". Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  3. ^ White, Kevin (August 21, 2017). "Family Played Key Role in Lewis Central Quarterback Max Duggan's Success From an Early Age". Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  4. ^ White, Kevin (December 6, 2018). "Lewis Central's Max Duggan named Iowa Gatorade Player of the Year". Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  5. ^ a b "Max Duggan, TCU Horned Frogs, Quarterback". 247Sports. Retrieved October 1, 2022.
  6. ^ Loy, Tom (March 7, 2018). "Top247 four-star QB Max Duggan: 'I grew up a Notre Dame fan'". Irish Illustrated. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  7. ^ Bain, Matthew (April 15, 2018). "Elite in-state QB Max Duggan commits to TCU". The Des Moines Register. Retrieved October 1, 2022.
  8. ^ Sherman, Mitch; Olson, Max (January 6, 2023). "How Max Duggan decided he belonged at TCU, no matter what". The Athletic. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
  9. ^ "Big second half helps TCU beat Arkansas-Pine Bluff 39–7". ESPN.com. Associated Press. September 1, 2019. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  10. ^ "TCU-SMU Postgame Notes". TCU Horned Frogs Athletics. September 21, 2019. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  11. ^ "Freshman Duggan shines as TCU knocks off No. 15 Texas 37–27". ESPN.com. Associated Press. October 26, 2019. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  12. ^ "Max Duggan – Football". TCU Athletics. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  13. ^ "2019 TCU Horned Frogs Stats". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
  14. ^ a b c Justice, Richard (December 2, 2022). "Heart Surgery, Foot Injuries, a Demotion to Backup—Max Duggan Overcame Them All". Texas Monthly. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  15. ^ McDaniel, Mike (December 3, 2022). "TCU QB Max Duggan Once Had a Nine-Hour Heart Surgery, Played Weeks Later". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  16. ^ a b "Max Duggan – Football". TCU Horned Frogs Athletics. Retrieved October 1, 2022.
  17. ^ "Max Duggan and TCU stun No. 9 Longhorns again 33–31". ESPN.com. Associated Press. October 3, 2020. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  18. ^ "QB Duggan paces TCU in 29–22 win over No. 19 Oklahoma State". ESPN.com. Associated Press. December 5, 2020. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  19. ^ "2020 TCU Horned Frogs Stats". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
  20. ^ Khan Jr., Sam (December 29, 2020). "Texas Bowl between TCU Horned Frogs, Arkansas Razorbacks canceled". ESPN.com. Retrieved December 29, 2020.
  21. ^ "No. 4 Oklahoma beats TCU 52–31 in Williams' starting debut". ESPN.com. Associated Press. October 17, 2021. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  22. ^ Wilson, Dave (October 31, 2021). "Coach Gary Patterson out at TCU after over 20 years". ESPN.com. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  23. ^ "Morris and TCU beat Baylor in first game without GP". ESPN.com. Associated Press. November 6, 2021. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  24. ^ Clinton, Bryan (December 6, 2021). "Sonny Dykes Says TCU Will Have Open QB Competition". Heartland College Sports. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  25. ^ "TCU cruises by Colorado 38–13 to kick off Sonny Dykes era". ESPN.com. Associated Press. September 3, 2022. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  26. ^ "Tarleton State at Texas Christian Box Score, September 10, 2022". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
  27. ^ "Texas Christian at SMU Box Score, September 24, 2022". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
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  29. ^ Hibbett, Connor (October 3, 2022). "Max Duggan named Big 12 Player of the Week". Texas Football. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  30. ^ "Duggan, Johnston lead No. 17 TCU past Kansas". ESPN.com. Associated Press. October 8, 2022. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
  31. ^ "TCU rallies for 43–40 win in 2 OTs over No. 8 Oklahoma St". ESPN.com. Associated Press. October 15, 2022. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
  32. ^ "No. 8 TCU rallies again to beat No. 17 K-State for B12 lead". ESPN.com. Associated Press. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
  33. ^ "No. 4 TCU still undefeated after game-ending FG at Baylor". ESPN.com. Associated Press. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
  34. ^ "No. 3 TCU loses 31–28 in OT to K-State in Big 12 title game". ESPN.com. Associated Press. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
  35. ^ Rittenberg, Adam (December 4, 2022). "Georgia, Michigan, TCU, Ohio State chosen for College Football Playoff". ESPN.com. Associated Press. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
  36. ^ "TCU's Wins 4 Individual Big 12 Honors Including Coach of the Year, Offensive Player of the Year". NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth. December 1, 2022. Retrieved December 3, 2022.
  37. ^ Wallis, Jay (December 8, 2022). "Max Duggan first TCU player to win national QB award since trophy was named after TCU QB from 1938". WFAA.com. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  38. ^ Johnson, Steven (November 30, 2022). "TCU Quarterback Max Duggan wins 2022 Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  39. ^ Johnson, Steven (December 5, 2022). "TCU Quarterback Max Duggan named Heisman Trophy finalist". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved December 9, 2022.
  40. ^ Kercheval, Ben (December 18, 2022). "2023 NFL Draft: TCU QB Max Duggan declares, but Heisman finalist will play for Horned Frogs through CFP run". CBSSports.com. Retrieved December 19, 2022.
  41. ^ "No. 3 TCU upsets No. 2 Michigan 51–45 in wild CFP semifinal". ESPN.com. Associated Press. December 31, 2022. Retrieved January 1, 2023.
  42. ^ "TCU vs. Michigan – College Football Box Score – December 31, 2022". ESPN.com. Retrieved January 1, 2023.
  43. ^ "College Football Championship – Texas Christian vs Georgia Box Score, January 9, 2023". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
  44. ^ "ISU's Joens and TCU's Duggan Named Inaugural Bob Bowlsby Award Winners" (Press release). Big 12 Conference. July 12, 2023. Retrieved August 6, 2023.
  45. ^ "TCU's Duggan, UT's Alfred Named 2022–23 Big 12 Athletes of the Year" (Press release). Big 12 Conference. July 31, 2023. Retrieved August 6, 2023.
  46. ^ "Max Duggan Draft and Combine Prospect Profile". NFL.com. Retrieved March 27, 2023.
  47. ^ "2023 NFL Draft Scout Max Duggan College Football Profile". DraftScout.com. Retrieved May 2, 2023.
  48. ^ Navarro, Omar (April 29, 2023). "5 Things to Know About New Chargers QB Max Duggan". Chargers.com. Retrieved July 9, 2023.
  49. ^ "Los Angeles Chargers Reduce Roster to 53 Players". Chargers.com. August 29, 2023. Retrieved October 12, 2023.
  50. ^ "Los Angeles Chargers Sign 12 Players to Practice Squad". Chargers.com. August 30, 2023. Retrieved October 12, 2023.
  51. ^ "Chargers' Max Duggan: Joins Bolts' roster". CBS Sports. Retrieved December 13, 2023.
  52. ^ "Los Angeles Chargers Announce Roster Moves". Chargers.com. December 19, 2023.
  53. ^ "Chargers sign Max Duggan to 53-player roster". NBC Sports. December 22, 2023. Retrieved December 23, 2023.
  54. ^ "Max Duggan: Parts ways with Chargers". CBS Sports. Retrieved December 26, 2023.
  55. ^ "Max Duggan: Back on Chargers' practice squad". CBS Sports. Retrieved December 28, 2023.
  56. ^ "Los Angeles Chargers Sign 11 Players to Contracts". Chargers.com. January 11, 2024.
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TCU Horned Frogs starting quarterbacks
  • Clark (1923–26)
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